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2008.04.10

Comments

silverdale florist

thanks, that sounds delicious.

cooing

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Josh

why are your tua naaw so white? i'm always curious about savory preservation/fermentation processes, but the tua naaw i'm familiar with are smashed up and packed into a banana leaf and grilled before being set aside to ferment. it looks like a medium-dark miso paste, but much smellier, with a great smoky taste.
it is one of my food priorities when i move back to thailand in a few months. eaten with sticky rice, green chilies, and whole garlic cloves, while sitting on the village astrologer's porch. what could be better?

[eatingclub] vancouver || js

Very, very interesting.

I hadn't realized that dill is also used in Lao (and/or other Southeast Asian) cooking. Truly informative.

I also am kind of in love with dill right now. I will have to try this soon.

tata

what are the alternatives to kha and lime leaves in the States? Am from PA.

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