« Lechon the Mindanao Way | Main | Pho, the Hoi An Way »

2008.12.22

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c509553ef0105368a9173970b

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Just the Thing for a Cold: 'Oregano', Tea, and Turmeric:

Comments

Wendy Hutton

Indian borage is indeed magical for colds, as almost all Asians know. Recently, I'd been fighting severe congestion with Western expectorants, then happened to find some of this herb in the Kota Kinabalu market. I brewed it up with water and rock sugar and sipped it day and night. The second day, my congestion was gone!

As this herb strongly resembles oregano, yet costs a fraction of that herb, it is widely used by food manufacturers for an oregano flavour.

Pepy

As I remember daun bangun-bangun is very popular in North Sumatra culinary. It's easy to get in Jakarta as well, especially wet markets that are closed to Tapanuli people areas. It's believed to help mothers who give breast feeding to their baby.

Pepy

As I remember daun bangun-bangun is very popular in North Sumatra culinary. It's easy to get in Jakarta as well, especially wet markets that are closed to Tapanuli people areas. It's believed to help mothers who give breast feeding to their baby.

Michael Koh

As it isn't easily available in England, I normally opt for boiled coca-cola with 4 slices of ginger to get rid of my cold and sore-throat. Seems to does the trick.

tina

hi there. in the philippines, this herb is commonly called oregano and usually used for treating coughs, either boiled as a tea or juice squeezed from fresh leaves, taken by teaspoons like ordinary cough medicines. it is also used to clean offals of meats, to remove odor prior to cooking.

Mila

I make a ginger and calamansi brew with honey. It's not as herbal as the ones you found above, but it keeps me hydrated, my throat soothed, and clears my congestion. Hope you're feeling better.

SkyJuice

I've been drinking a glass of warm/room temp water with a tablespoonful of pure honey and a sprinkle of cinnamon powder on a regular basis for 2 years, and have found that it's extremely good for nasty cold as well. My cold is usually gone within 3 days.

http://skyjuice7.blogspot.com/2008/08/honey-cinnamon-remedy.html

Robyn

Wendy, it certainly worked for me, in the PHI. Interesting abt the subsitution of this herb for oregano in the packaged dried stuff.

Hi Pepy - yes, suppposedly it's popular with Batak. Thanks for the tip about Tapanuli wet markets ... something to investigate the next time we're in Jakarta.

Michael - ginger's popular but the coca-cola twist is new to me!

hi tina - the use with offal would make sense...

mila - ginger again. Possibly the most popular cold remedy out there.

Skyjuice - sounds very similar to Indonesian bandrek. There is something about warm spices that's so soothing ...

Cupcake

Ribena.

j.

I remember that herb being slightly bruised and placed on each side of a woman's temple in the Philippine. They said that it helped with headaches or nausea as well.

j.

by temple I mean her forehead area...

plumpernickel

My mother used to lightly roast these on a griddle, blend it coarsely and make a raita with yogurt, salt, roast cummin powder, paprika, finely chopped green chillies and coriander. Funny thing is we didn't know the exact Indian name either, because this was grown by one of our cooks.

Indira

This is called omavalli in Tamil. We have always had this in our garden in Singapore. My mother boils this along with ginger, holy basil and a medicinal herb called Mochi that smells like eucalyptus to give to us to drink when we have colds. It is supposed to clear the phelgm that congests chests. We have never used it for cooking though.

Indira

This is called omavalli in Tamil. We have always had this in our garden in Singapore. My mother boils this along with ginger, holy basil and a medicinal herb called Mochi that smells like eucalyptus to give to us to drink when we have colds. It is supposed to clear the phelgm that congests chests. We have never used it for cooking though.

Indira

This is called omavalli in Tamil. We have always had this in our garden in Singapore. My mother boils this along with ginger, holy basil and a medicinal herb called Mochi that smells like eucalyptus to give to us to drink when we have colds. It is supposed to clear the phelgm that congests chests. We have never used it for cooking though.

K Doowa

Here in Vientiane we bruise ginger and lemongrass with a pestle and simmer for at least 20 minutes. Add more water and it can be reboiled twice more.

Adam

My list includes:

Echinacea
Astragalus
Mullen
Slippery elm

I've also had good luck with "Umcka", it originates from the traditional Zulu medicine for coughs and respiratory ailments.

I have also used a leafy green tea that reminds me of the post when I was in Haiti, but I don't know the name for it.

heidi leon

My mom used to give me back home (Cuernavaca, Mexico) a tea from fresh tulipan flower (not tulip) served with some bee honey and fresh lime juice.

If the cold was serious then she turned to the mexican herbolaria remedy (traditional medicine), te de gordolobo. Check this link: http://www.herbalsafety.utep.edu/facts.asp?ID=11

oh and btw, we use oregano for many of the traditional dishes of mexican cuisine, never knew it was good for a cold. We prepare a tea as a remedy against stomach pain.( Specially good to fight PMS cramps!!)

marc medina

VODKA. Double. Straight up. With honey.

pratibha

This herb is most powerful when eatern fresh - you can eithr chew it or just juice it and drink up the juice. It is called Omavalli and one stalk in a plater or garden is enough to create a patch in a year! Thrives in tropical weather!

Rumsua: Ancestral Traditions

Love your articles! During 1565-1815, saliors of the Manila Galleons were responsible for bringing several tropical fruits and plants into the New World. Likewise, several New World species made their way into the Philippines where they spread to other parts of Asia. Oregano may have been one of those transported herbs.

When I had a scratchy throat back in the Philippines, my friend took an Oregano leaf, poured some honey on it, and popped it in my mouth. That was a treat! :-D

Pat

I know this is an old post, but I'll go ahead and add that in Guyana (South America) where I was born, this "oregano" is known as thick-leaf thyme or broad-leaf thyme. It is used as a seasoning - chopped or ground, or for tea. It is particularly good as a seasoning for fish or in fish broths. It also blends well with other traditional seasonings like onion and garlic. I usually chop it all up together in a food processor and I really like the melded flavor.
I have also seen a white edged version of it referred to online as tropical oregano. It is also edible. My aunt has some in her garden as a decorative plant and it smells the same, but I haven't tried to cook it yet.
I'll add that thick-leaf thyme, as I call it, is extremely hardy in a tropical environment. We always have a plant in our yard, wherever we live, and usually all this involves is cutting off a sprig from an old plant, sticking it in the ground and watering it for the first few days. After that, we don't even need to water it. It survives on rain and grows profusely. A couple years ago I tried to trim our current plant back and discarded the trimmings by tossing them into a corner of the yard. I looked over a couple weeks later and realised that the trimmings had all taken root and we had a whole set of the plants growing over there too!

Organic Green Tea

can you let me know if can I get this products on my country?

Ben

Here in the northern part of mindanao, Philippines, we call this herb "Kulabo" and is taken as a remedy to colds, sore throat and indigestion.

When I googled this herb, I found out that other people call this Mexican Herb. Can anybody confirm if this is really the same mexican oregano used in mexican dishes? Thanks.

Viagra Online

Hello When a string of early mornings (as in 3am, for dawn mass) and non-stop days lay me low the kitchen angels at our host's home boiled up batch after batch of tea made with an herb growing wild outside the house.
John B. Barnhart

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been saved. Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Comments are moderated, and will not appear until the author has approved them.