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2009.01.29

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Comments

Christine

Oh wow. These look amazing...totally thinking I could recreate this in an ebelskiver pan. And to think that I was putting off purchasing said pan, because it only has one use. Huzzah, now there are two.

You had me at coconut.

Eurasian Sensation

I'm really curious about the connection with the Indonesian apam, the Malaysian apom balik, and the Sri Lankan/South Indian appam (hoppers). All are rice flour & coconut pancakes, but where did the dish orginate? SE Asian cuisine reflects a lot of South Asian influence, but there is considerable Indonesian/Malay influence in Sri Lanka as well.
I'd love it if someone out there had an answer for that.

Robyn

Christine - There should be LOTS of grated coconut meat in these. Leave a comment if you're able to recreate the recipe.

ES - And then there is Thai kanom krok, and a similar Cambodian coconut 'pancake' ... not to mention Filipino puto. Like you I'm also curious as to where these originated ...

Kitt

I'd love to try those. I guess I'll have to look for a recipe and try to make them myself!

Hazel

I loved the steamed appam I ate in South India, which were made with a fermented batter. They had a slightly acid taste and were always served with a viciously spicy sambar a coconut chatni I've been trying to re-create ever since, but not having access to a coconut grinder or several of the ingredients I'm just going to have to wait until I can get back to Bangalore. We used to have them for breakfast - all the westerners were skeptical to start with but all were quickly converted. These sound like a wonderful variation on the same theme, though I think I'd miss the chilli-lime-coconut-coriander-mustard hit of the sambar and the chatni.

Pepy

I almost thought that you were in India as you said apam. I wish I had apem mould :)

Selba

Ah.... nice kue apem!

Barbara

Wow, these look delicious. I really often wonder why the best-tasting food are often sold in carts on the streets, wet markets, or watering holes rather than those in restaurants.

Anyway, right now I can't think of a similar Filipino delicacy. Puto is made generally of flour while the bibingka is made of soybean flour although both are garnished with grated coconut. But this Apam is made entirely of coconut batter? Interesting. Hope I can taste some one day.

Barbara

Wow, these look delicious. I really often wonder why the best-tasting food are often sold in carts on the streets, wet markets, or watering holes rather than those in restaurants.

Anyway, right now I can't think of a similar Filipino delicacy. Puto is made generally of flour while the bibingka is made of soybean flour although both are garnished with grated coconut. But this Apam is made entirely of coconut batter? Interesting. Hope I can taste some one day.

Tuty

Fantastic apem close-up photo... My mouth waters.

mira212

adoiii!! i love these!! yum! i seriously love this.. my mum used to make this a lil bit of rice flour, glutinous rice flour, wheat flour and leave overnight, then add salt.. before putting into the cast!! waaaaaa, i miss this so much!! great post! :)

Pat

My mum has a single apam pan--it looks like a mini wok! I have yet to try making it. Perhaps now I shall. Happy travels!

Mike Aquino

Wow, I totally missed that when I was at Jogja!

Is it anything like the Filipino bibingka? The variant with the egg sounds like it would have that same savory-sweet flavor I love about bibingka. Damn, I'm hungry now.

Jarrett Wrisley

Great post guys - those photos are remarkable - and they make me remarkably hungry.

Takeaways

Oh just wow, please post more about Indonesian food, growing up with it made me appreciate it but there are still many things unknown to me... this is one of them. I know where to go now next time I am in Indonesia.

retro grrrl

Looks really delicious.

Ellen

Wow, how beautiful these look! I just discovered your blog and look forward to reading it in the future.

sarah & gan

i love apam!! why can't i get it here in nyc...sob....

Jollibee Food Corporation

I never taste this one.My grandmother knows how to cook different Filipino delicacy.But this one is different.Thanks for mentioning.

-Ava

vicong

In Indonesia we called it Serabi, common snack for Javanese and Sundanese also they are still the best for serabi master :)

Another cake we called it apem, not the one that grilled like your photo here. I think apem in Indonesia is the steam one

vicong

Also I remember in Sundanese area (I think Javanese area too) a lot of traditional seller using serabi tray that made from clay not cast iron.

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