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2009.06.15

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Comments

amy lee

love fish balls. . .esp. with funn in soup.

cass: where do you go for fish ball funn soup? i used to go to a restaurant in chinatown, by the river, a long time ago. it changed owners. haven't found a decent place since.

Lisa

best post title -ever-

Lor

This is why I keep coming back, again and again, to read this blog. Amazing writing, beautiful photos, and the absolute REALness of your experience. I like that not every trip is a raging foodie success followed by another success - and it makes discoveries like these ridiculously delicious looking balls o'goodness just shine.

I'm sitting here eating bacon. I wish I were eating shrimp/fish/meat balls instead.

Bong

Excellent pictures as usual and this article.... it just made me really hungry! Great article... great stories!

Hsuan

Definitely looking forward to your upcoming post on Tainan (I am biased since I grew up in that city)! The 'awesomeness' of these artisnal fishballs you write about are something that we in the south simply take for granted (obviously something I miss). I hoped you managed to find very similar stands in Tainan? One of my favourites specialises only in 6 varieties, and thoughts of them still make my mouth water. I would ordinarily associate fishballs as a breakfast item quickly eaten by people on their way to work. I wonder if you managed to experience breakfast 'rice table' (not the Indonesian variety) set up near temples in Tainan where retired people (don't expect to see anyone under 50 there, it's not considered 'cool', but the food is fantastic), or the hand-rolled 'fish' noodles (they are literally fish pounded, mixed with very little rice/tapioca flour to achieve noodle consistency; quickly cooked and doused with a mirin-soy sauce 'dressing' and topped with seaweed), oyster 'cakes' fried in large spoons, milk-fish porridge, shrimp rice (also breakfast item)...I can go on, but I will wait for your update!

Jenny

That looks a lot like 'mee pok' -I'm guessing it's either the same dish or mee pok derived from this! I can certainly see a lot of Fujian/Teochew influences in Singaporean/Malaysian cuisine.

Anne- flowers tea

Hi there :) I had fun reading your post here, it seem you had a good adventure. The food looks really great, the fish balls w/ soup got my attention because I haven't eaten one before, very interesting. This is my first visit to your blog and 'be back to check more of your posts here. Thanks for sharing your story.

~Anne

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