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« The Price of Progress in Chiang Mai | Main | Shan Pickle »

2010.04.19

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Comments

Leela

I have a long way to go when it comes to training my palate to appreciate northern Laab, but that namprik ong is sure making me drool. A basket of warm sticky rice, namprik ong, and some crispy pork rinds would be lovely right now.

By the way, Robyn, the signage above the shop in the second picture says "ศรจันทร์" in Thai. Shouldn't the name be So(r)n Jan or So(r) Chan?

Robyn

Hi Leela - I don't find northern laab so challenging. Is it the innards that put you off?
Yes, thanks, I know it's Sorn Chan (that's what my friend calls it) ... but the English signage attached to the front of the shop's display case spells is "Sorn Chai" ... and I figured that for the sake of non-Thai readers looking for the place I should go with what the shop's put up in English.

J2Kfm

Oh if this is opposite of Tha Phae gate then I think should be easy to locate. Have you tried the vegetarian restaurant, on the left once entering the gate?

borneoboy

This place looks great ! Damn. I missed it when I was in Chiang Mai. Have to go back now ! ;)

Any Idiot Can

Haven't eaten here, will have to check it out on my next trip to CM.

And agree with you on eating food that's been 'left out'. I've lived in Bangkok for more than 7 years and have lost count of the number of 'left out' and 'lukewarm' dishes I've eaten. In 7 years, I've only ever once had food poisoning and that was from water melon that was in an iced road-side cart.

Beats the US, where I used to get food poisoning three or four times a year :)

Austin

Had lunch here today and thought the laap was pretty tasty. By the way, the English-language sign now says Sorn Chan, and they've posted this blog post on their wall!

Incidentally, in central Thai khua means to dry-roast, but in northern Thai it is the general word for frying -- including frying with oil or liquid. The khua in the name refers to the last step, when the meat is cooked (this version of the dish is also called laap suk, 'cooked' laap, as opposed to laap dip, 'raw' laap), not the dry roasting of the curry paste ingredients.

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