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2006.01.11

Comments

Kalyn

What a wonderful treat, reading this. I would love to go there and see what interesting new foods I could discover.

phizackerly

Everytime I read your site, I think what an excellent site it is. The Malaysian Tourism Board should have a link to it. In fact, they should run an advertising campaign which just consists of extracts for your blog, followed by the word Malaysia and a toll-free number for MAS.

Karen

Oh my, what fantastic pictures! And you describe everything so vividly too.

I am not sure what those leaves under the okra bunches are but if they are indeed leaves, they seem to be succulent, perhaps related to cacti like aloe vera. I'm guessing here though. It is most probably the "green stem adorned by both leaves and whispy fronds" which are called "peko" - paku in Indonesian and many Filipino languages. Those are edible ferns, eaten fresh in salads.

Robyn

Hi Karen - edible ferns are "paku" here too, but yes I definately might have misunderstood her when she called the succulent spears "peko". These paku are quite different to anything I've seen in KL. By the way, what do you do with edible ferns in the Philippines?

phizackerly, I agree completely. Not re: the excellent blog part - thanks, BTW - but with the fact that MTB is missing the boat when it comes to it's non-promotion of Malaysia as a food destination. It's something Dave and I have been scratching our heads over for at least the last 4 months - I mean, when it comes to food in SE Asia, Malaysia just doesn't even register in most western minds. (Compare to knowledge of Thailand and Vietnam, even Lao, as food destinations.) Something could be - should be - done about that. Think I'll post a rant on the topic.

Kalyn, thanks as always. Too bad I can't make the blog scratch and sniff! ;-)

Tania

lovely pictures of fresh veg! About the paku though, I've eaten it Sarawak style, stir fried lightly with belacan and chilli paste and dried prawn powder. Absolutely yummy. You should check out some markets in Sarawak too, - they have the strangest but assuredly most delicious things there too..

Evil Jonny

Awesome! What a food orgy. It'd be like dying and going to food heaven for me. Thanks for sharing this!

Ray

The "Peko" you mentioned.

I am a Kelantanese and I think you mean " Beko " ( pronunciation : bae-kor ).

It is a kind of fruit quite similar to Petai but minus the "eye" and much wider in width and it grows on tall tree.

Prior to consuming, the hard outer skin is scrubbed clean by means of boiling or direct heat. Then sliced thinly as a main ingredient for a perfect Kerabu Beko ( Beko Salad )

http://www.angelfire.com/journal2/rahsia_resepi/s03.htm

Ray

...and the " green stem adorned by both leaves and whispy fronds ".
Did it have reddish tinge on its leafy shoot?

If so it is a type of Paku, related but not the same as the strikingly green and more common Paku sold in many other places.

The Kelantanese call it " pucuk miding "
( poo-cho' mee-ding )

It is often made into Gulai Lemak ( Coconut Milk Stew )or simple salad to be enjoyed with fermented fish sauce ( budu ).

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